At this point no one is safe from the news of the school shooting at Sandy Hook. It’s plastered on every news channel and mentioned in every political debate. If you’re like me, and this kind of rampancy has a tendency to numb you to the severity of such an important issue, I’d like to pass along this article from Patricia Hernandez at Kotaku.

It is not another take on the shooting, nor is it a defense or attack on violent videogames. It’s a heart-wrenching take on violence in our lives on a personal level. Through stories from her childhood, Hernandez reflects on how a history of videogame violence has affected her and how it could affect us.

I noticed how games were often hours and hours and hours of killing endless mobs of men that often looked exactly the same. Why does every room and level have a bunch of shit to kill no matter what it is I’m playing? And why can’t I just turn my brain off like I used to; what’s wrong? Why can’t I just aim and shoot?

Games became exasperating for a long time after that.


Jared Chadwick

 
Jared Chadwick is an English major who takes writing about videogames more seriously than finding a respectable profession. Find him on Facebook