Every so often some seemingly innocuous occurrence will spark a chain reaction that sets fire to a sleeping giant. In this case it was a perfect storm involving Mountain Dew and Doritos, Geoff Keighley, Twitter, and a mislabeled public restroom.

Ok, one of those may or may not actually be involved, but to find out which you’ll have to check out this lengthy but impressively comprehensive article by Stephen Totilo on Kotaku. It’s come to be known as “Dorito-gate,” and if you’re looking for a quick recap I’ll let Totilo’s article speak for itself.

“Dorito-gate is a multi-part mess. It involves:

1) criticism of GTTV host Geoff Keighley doing interviews while seated between bags of Doritos and bottles of Mountain Dew that were wrapped with ads for Halo 4, 2) a Eurogamer column by Robert “Rab” Florence about that, the occurrence of British games journalists at an awards show making promotional Tweets for a game in hopes of winning a free PlayStation 3, 3) an apparent legal threat by journalist Lauren Wainwright and/or her editors that compelled Eurogamer to remove a reference to her in the piece that quoted a Tweet in which she seemed to deem the contest as not that big a deal, 4) the removal of which quote from the article compelled Florence to quit, 5) the listing, since deleted, on Wainwright’s resume, of having done work for Square Enix, a publisher whose games she’s covered, and 6) from there, an avalanche of complaints and suspicion about the coziness of the gaming press with the public relations wing of the companies whose games they cover.”

How’s that for a blockbuster in the making? Okay, it might not be movie material, but this culmination of events could -and undoubtedly will – have serious ramifications on the relationships between publishers, game journalists, and consumers.


Jared Chadwick

 
Jared Chadwick is an English major who takes writing about videogames more seriously than finding a respectable profession. Find him on Facebook