This is the true story of how six fellow writers and friends systematically betrayed one another over several weeks because of a relentless drive to control the galaxy.

Neptune’s Pride 2: Triton is a unique beast, a “real-time strategy” game in the truest sense of the phrase. Players are given control over a certain amount of stars, and challenged with taking over as much of the rest available. Of course, in order to do this, they have to engage in battle with one another. And battle moves slowly. An attack can take hours or even days to reach another star, often with unforeseen results.

The game is diplomatic in nature. Players make alliances, trade resources, and commit to stick together to the end, all for the sake of their own self-interest. It’s impossible to survive without allies, but also impossible to win with them. In Neptune’s Pride, second place means nothing.

Eventually, someone gets hurt.

It’s all fun and games, until someone loses their friend, their faith in humanity, or their grip on real life. Below are the audio records (each around eight minutes long) of our six captains, each grappling with their own struggles in real time. Click on the chapter titles to listen.

The Players (pictured below from right to left):  Jordan Ekeroth (red), Drew Dixon (orange), Richard Clark (blue), Luke Larsen (light blue), M. Joshua Caller (green), and Steven Sukkau (yellow). 

Day2

Special thanks to Jay Tholen, who provided the soundtrack to this space epic (and is also working on the previously featured adventure game, Dropsy.) You can check out more of his music here.

Chapter 1: Control

“If we team up, I think we’d be unstoppable.”

 

Chapter 2: Stargaze

“Already I feel a strange sense of unease.”

 

Chapter 3: Time Rift

“I’m spending way too much time thinking about this.”

 

Chapter 4: We Have Become Space Monsters

“You bastard.”

 

Chapter 5: Crumbling Nebula

“I’m not sure it’s possible to conquer the galaxy and live well.”

 

Chapter 6: The Flight Home

“I’m going to win this game, and all I will get in return is this fleeting feeling that I’m able to outsmart my friends.”

 


Richard Clark

 
Richard Clark is the managing editor of Gamechurch, the editor-in-chief of Christ and Pop Culture, a regular columnist at Unwinnable, and a staff writer for Kill Screen. He can be reached at deadyetliving at gmail dot com or followed on twitter @deadyetliving.